A Glorious Death

Note: Some time ago I had the privilege of being a guest speaker in an overseas congregation. This is the message God put on my heart then. I hope it will be an encouragement to you now.

Would you like to have tea with Jesus? If you got an invitation from Jesus to come meet him at a café and share a strong cup of coffee and pastry, how would you feel? I would be so excited, wouldn’t you? I had heard so much about Jesus, even from the age of a young child. My parents told me the stories of the Bible. I imagined Jesus doing miracles – extending his hand to heal a leper, rubbing mud together to anoint the eyes of the blind, raising a young man out of his coffin, holding children on his lap. What must it have been like to have been there and watch him do those wonderful things? I can only imagine. I wish I could have been there. I wish I could talk with him. I wish I could see him.

When Jesus walked this earth, people far away begin to hear the same stories I heard when I was a child. They, too, were fascinated by what they heard. Could this really be him, the man that was prophesied about? Could this be the Promised One, the One sent from God to take away the sins of the world? Who else could heal like that? Who else could make dead men walk? Who else was bold enough to declare that a man’s sins were forgiven? Maybe, if they could just see for themselves, they would know for sure. Maybe they would get a chance to see him do a miracle. Or at least, they could share some tea and hear him speak.

In the gospel of John, chapter 12, we read a story of some men – men from Greece – who had heard about Jesus. They wanted to meet Jesus, but didn’t know how to set up a meeting. So they passed a message to one of Jesus’ disciples, Philip. Philip went and told Andrew, and together they approached Jesus. Let’s read this story together from John 12, verses 20-30 (ESV).

20 Now among those who went up to worship at the feast were some Greeks. 21 So these came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida in Galilee, and asked him, “Sir, we wish to see Jesus.” 22 Philip went and told Andrew; Andrew and Philip went and told Jesus. 23 And Jesus answered them, “The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. 24 Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. 25 Whoever loves his life loses it, and whoever hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. 26 If anyone serves me, he must follow me; and where I am, there will my servant be also. If anyone serves me, the Father will honor him.

27 “Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But for this purpose I have come to this hour. 28 Father, glorify your name.” Then a voice came from heaven: “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again.” 29 The crowd that stood there and heard it said that it had thundered. Others said, “An angel has spoken to him.” 30 Jesus answered, “This voice has come for your sake, not mine.

There is something so interesting – and beautiful – about how Jesus responds to these people. They have asked to see him, to experience him, to get to know him. And they have come at just the right time! Jesus said it is the hour for his glorification. Who wouldn’t want to be on hand to witness Jesus’ glorification? Is this where he would be crowned king or do some astonishing miracle? But instead of the kind of glory they were probably imagining, Jesus begins to speak of death. It is hard for me to imagine that death would be part of glory. When I think of glory, I think of people saying nice things about me, congratulating me, giving me a promotion, increasing my pay, treating me like a movie star. But for Jesus, glory involved death. Listen to his words again:

“The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified. 24 Truly, truly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it bears much fruit. 25 Whoever loves his life loses it, and whoever hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. 26 If anyone serves me, he must follow me; and where I am, there will my servant be also. If anyone serves me, the Father will honor him.

27 “Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But for this purpose I have come to this hour. 28 Father, glorify your name.” Then a voice came from heaven: “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again.”

If you want to see Jesus – to really know and experience him – you need to peer into his death. His death was voluntary. His death was planned. His death was perfectly timed. His death was God’s act of planting a seed into the ground. Without this seed falling, dying, and splitting open, there would not be the glory of new and abundant life. It was the only way. Death was not Jesus’ final destination, but he had to go there. The road to Glory led directly through Death. There was no detour. This was a planned stop. Jesus’ glory was joined with his death. “Sir, we wish to see Jesus,” the curious Greeks asked. Jesus replied, “You want to see me? You want to get to know me? Come know me in death.”

Jesus, before he could usher in the glorious New Creation, had to die in the sin-stained soil of Old Creation.

Jesus, before he could represent the true Tree of Life, had to be broken on a cross of death.

Jesus, before he could be the abundant Bread of Life had to die a cursed grain of wheat.

Other people would have run from death or begged God to send someone else. Not Jesus. He came to earth for this very purpose – to die. And because Jesus knew that his death would result in a mighty harvest of life, he looked at death as an act of immense glory. Who else was worthy? Who else’s blood sacrifice could take away sins? Who else could attract God’s wrath to himself while repelling God’s wrath from those who deserved it? Who else could turn an end of life into a beginning of life for so many? Only Jesus! Only Jesus! Only Jesus!

I am sure the curious Greeks did not know what they were asking for. Maybe they expected to be invited to tea, or to witness water being turned to wine. Instead, Jesus invited them to his own funeral. He gave them a choice to serve him and follow him and be with him and even share in his glory. They were invited into a very sacred place – nearness and closeness with Jesus.

Jesus did not want to “remain alone” – he wanted to be first among many. The scriptures say that Jesus is the firstborn among many brothers. Think of it: the only Son of God wanted brothers and sisters, so he paid for their adoption with his own blood. No wonder his death was glorious! His death brought us near and made us family with the Most High God!

In America, we are proud people. We think we can have whatever we want. We think we can get good jobs, earn a lot of money, and buy our happiness. Our parents tell us we can be and do anything. How stubborn we are! When we hear about Jesus, we hope that he can help us get rich and have success. We don’t want anything to do with his death. We want to do everything to avoid death. Death to us is not glorious, so Jesus’ death does not make sense to us. I hope you do not think this way in your country!

Jesus’ death is glorious, for without it, we could never be adopted into God’s family. The grain of wheat had to fall into the ground and die so it could bear much fruit. We – those of us who trust in Jesus and turn from our sins – are that fruit!

When Jesus breathed his last, the guard at the foot of cross exclaimed, “Surely this man was the Son of God!” Even he was struck with Jesus’ glory at his moment of death.

But Jesus did not die just so we could live any way we wanted. He died to change everything about us. Yes, his death gave us the promise of salvation. But his death also showed us how, we too, must live a life that embraces dying. Remember the passage we read in John? Jesus said the servants must be with him where he is. Do you want to serve Jesus? You must walk the same road as he is walking. The glory road. The death road. They are the same. Hear these words that are meant for your ears:

Philippians 1:29 says: “For it has been granted to you that for the sake of Christ you should not only believe in him but also suffer for his sake.”

Romans 8:35-37 says: “Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? As it is written, ‘For your sake we are being killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.’ No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.”

Galatians 2:20 says: “I have been crucified with Christ; and it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself up for me.”

2 Corinthians 4:7-12 says, “But we have this treasure in jars of clay, to show that the surpassing power belongs to God and not to us. We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying in the body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our bodies. For we who live are always being given over to death for Jesus’ sake, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh. So death is at work in us, but life in you.”

Jesus is no longer here walking the earth. So the next time someone hears the stories of Jesus’ life and work and wants to know him, what will they do? What if a group of curious people come to you and say, “Sir, we would see Jesus!” Will they know him through you? Can you invite them to “come and see”? Will they see his glory through your death? You might say, “How can they see my death if I’m still alive?” Well, first, do they see that Jesus’ death has given you hope, purpose, and peace with God? They must see that in you. But what are some other ways your life can be a witness to the glory of Jesus’ death?

  • When you choose to embrace suffering as part of Jesus’ will for your life.
  • When you say no to the pleasures of sin.
  • When you choose to share the gospel with someone who might react violently.
  • When you give up your future dreams in order to follow Jesus now.
  • When you stop chasing success and settle for a simpler life where you can give more away and serve more frequently.
  • When you invite strangers into your home to show them care and share the stories of Jesus.
  • When you choose to live Jesus’ way instead of your family’s way and are punished for it.
  • When your national identity is secondary to your spiritual identity.
  • When you give up trying to fight and win arguments but choose the humble way of forgiveness.
  • When you face tragedy and end of life with a profound peace that only could be explained by the hope of Jesus.
  • When you clearly identify yourself as a follower of Jesus, knowing that in so doing you will be held in suspicion and dishonor.

These are all characteristics of a life that identifies with the death of Jesus. Brothers and sisters, a life that bears the marks of Jesus’ death is glorious indeed! You are invited to be with him where he is. He is calling you to come and die with him. Identify with him in his death, knowing you will be raised with him in his life. And the next time someone asks how to know Jesus, we can point to you, or you, or you and say, “Come and see how they die, yet are more alive than you could ever imagine.”

Let us pray.

Jesus, thank you for sharing your death with us. How glorious it is. Your name is to be forever praised. I ask that you help my brothers and sisters here in this place to embrace your death and trust in you with all their hearts. May they experience your nearness and glory as they walk in your footsteps. Give them a joy that cannot be explained. Give them courage to follow even when it costs them dearly. Give them a bold witness to share their faith with others. We know the time is short, and soon you will return. Please find us faithful.

In Jesus’ name, Amen.

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